Outcomes

Outcomes-2

Population Health Outcomes

What do you want to know more about?

Cardiovascular disease (CVD)

Key statistics

Indicators of CVD outcomes for our region have been drawn from Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHOF). Bold figures in the table below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of preventable mortality in the UK. This is particularly true for men. The CVD preventable mortality rates have traditionally been lower than the England average in all three areas, and there has been a large drop in rates since 2001. However, in all three areas this reduction is now levelling out whilst the England average rates continue to fall. This is most noticeable in Bournemouth the for the first time the rates are now similar to the England average and are likely to exceed it in the next few years.

Dementia

Key statistics

Dementia  indicaters are drawn from the Dementia profile (PHE)Bold figures in the tables below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

Dementia refers to a set of symptoms associated with an ongoing decline in brain function. These symptoms may include problems with memory loss, understanding, problem-solving, language, mood and movement, which cause difficulties with carrying out daily living activities. There are several types of dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease (a progressive disease that affects the brain) and vascular dementia (when the brain is damaged due to issues with blood supply) being the most common. Research commissioned by the Alzheimer’s society estimates the number of people with dementia will increase to over 1 million by 2025, assuming there are no public health interventions and change is being driven by the ageing population alone.

England has an aging population and the South West of England has a net migration of retirees. Consequently, there is concern regarding the eventual impact of dementia on the Dorset health and care system.

The number of people dying with dementia has been steadily increasing in Bournemouth, Dorset & Poole since 2011 despite little change in the recorded dementia prevalence rates. This is of particular concern for Dorset, which has the lowest estimated diagnosis rate, indicating a significant number of people are not being diagnosed, and potentially not receiving the right care.

Diabetes Type II

Key statistics

Indicators of Diabetes outcomes for our region have been drawn from Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHOF) (Top Table) and Diabetes Profile (Lower Table). Bold figures in the tables below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

Diabetes is an important health condition because of its impact on quality of life (including blindness and leg amputation), and because it is a precursor of cardiovascular disease, one of the largest causes of preventable mortality. Diabetes is being driven by both the increasing rate of obesity and an aging population.

In addition to direct suffering diabetes brings to the population, it also drives a number of other health outcomes including

  • CVD rates
  • Amputations
  • Dialysis time

The prevalence of recorded diabetes is increasing in all areas, but is only higher than the national average in Bournemouth. Since 2014, there has been no change in the proportion of adults eating 5 portions of fruit or vegetables a day, or the proportion overweight children in any area. Poole has the highest proportion of physically inactive adults in the South West (significantly higher than the England average).

Diabetes Type II is largely preventable with the following risk factors

  • Poor diet
  • Physical inactivity leading to obesity
  • High blood sugar levels

Life Expectancy (LE)

Key statistics

Life and healthy life expectancy indicators for Bournemouth, Poole, Dorset and England, Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHE).  Bold figures in the tables below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

Life expectancy is an indicator of overall population health, while healthy life expectancy is a measure of the years lived without disability. Both of these indicators are based on lifecourse conditions, and it is therefore only an estimate for future lives lived.

Life and healthy life expectancy indicators for Bournemouth show no significant differences from the England average, while those for Dorset and Poole are mostly significantly better than England.

There reason for the differences in life expectancy between Bournemouth, Poole and Dorset are unknown, but are most often ascribed to lifecourse conditions as described by indicators of socio-economic deprivation, such as the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD).

One consequence of increasing population life expectancy, generally, is that older people form an increasing proportion of the population, i.e. our population is ageing. Preparing for the socio-economic effects of higher numbers of older people, and especially the ‘oldest old’ (those age over 85) is likely to prove challenging to local planners, social care providers, the NHS, and the range of institutions and public bodies concerned with the welfare and well-being of the population.

Mental health

Key statistics

Mental health prevalence and outcome indicators are drawn from the Mental Health and Wellbeing profiles. Bold figures in the tables below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

The Global Burden of Disease study identified mild depression as a significant burden of ill health. Additionally, this falls primarily on working age adults and is therefore potentially an important indicator of workforce health. Mental health problems tend to be concentrated in those without sufficient social or financial resources to take control over their own lives. This is reflected in the indicators where Bournemouth, which has the highest level of deprivation, also has the highest admissions for self-harm and the highest suicide rates. There are significant shortcoming with much of the data in this area and the indicators need to be thoroughly investigated before they are used.

Morbidity (illness or injury)

Key statistics

The full list of morbidity indicators produced by Public Health England are available through their Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHOF). Bold figures in the tables below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

Hip fractures, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are important factors related to leading to, living with, or caused by poor health respectively. Understanding how they occur with the population can help us to plan to improve the quality of life for people of all ages and reduce preventable deaths.

Diabetes (type 2) is especially important as it is almost entirely preventable with changes in diet and increased physical activity. It is currently increasing in all areas.  On the other hand patients with Coronary Heart Disease have been declining. Related to both of these are hip fractures which can leave people with reduced mobility, chronic pain and at risk of depression.  Bournemouth and Poole have the highest rate of hip fractures in the South West.

Injuries for children and young people are also a key area, being a leading cause of hospitalisation and premature mortality in this age group. Admission rates for young people are higher than England for all three Local Authorities, and higher in Dorset and Poole for children.

Mortality (deaths)

Key statistics

The full list of mortality indicators produced by Public Health England are available through their Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHOF). Bold figures in the tables below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

Understanding how much mortality is preventable is key to our work.  Once we know this we can begin to develop ways to improve the health of the population in an evidence derived fashion.

Age standardised rates from preventable causes are significantly lower in Dorset and Poole than the English average. Bournemouth has the 3rd highest preventable mortality rate in the South West. However, in each authority the preventable mortality rate is significantly higher for males than female.

Locally, Cancer and Coronary Heart Disease contribute a high rate of Potential Years of Life Lost (PYLL). Preventable CVD deaths had seen a decrease until recent years when the mortality rate plateaued in Bournemouth, Dorset and Poole despite a continued decrease in the England average. Rates of preventable deaths are better than England in Dorset and Poole for both CVD and Cancer.

Motor Vehicle Crashes (MVC)

Key statistics

Motor vehicle crash impact indicators are drawn from the Public Health Outcome Framework and Health Profiles (PHE). Bold figures in the tables below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

Traffic accidents are a major cause of preventable deaths, particularly for younger age groups, and the majority of collisions can be avoided through improved education and awareness, road infrastructure and vehicle safety. It is important that our roads are safe, especially given national focus to increase physical activity and active travel rates.

Compared to the England average, Bournemouth has a similar KSI rate, but Poole and Dorset are higher. KSI rates for children under 16 years are also higher in Dorset. In the period 2013 – 2015 there were 1,167 people killed or seriously injured across the pan-Dorset area, with 63% taking place on Dorset roads.

Musculo-skeletal (MSK)

Key statistics

MSK prevelance and outcome indicaters are drawn from the Physical Activity profile (PHE)Bold figures in the tables below indicate a statistically significant difference from the respective English Average; * indicates missing data.

Additional information
Discussion

The Global Burden of disease study identified musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions, particularly lower back pain, as being a significant health burden. This falls primarily on working age adults and is therefore potentially an important indicator of workforce health. Additionally, because of reduced mobility associated with MSK conditions this can increase the risk of other conditions (e.g. CVD) and the likelihood of a fall.

Search Public Health Dorset

Connect with us